Pride and Poverty: An Observation from Chesterton

“EVERYTHING in our age has, when carefully examined, this fundamentally undemocratic quality. In religion and morals we should admit, in the abstract, that the sins of the educated classes were as great as, or perhaps greater than, the sins of the poor and ignorant. But in practice the great difference between the mediaeval ethics and ours is that ours concentrate attention on the sins which are the sins of the ignorant, and practically deny that the sins which are the sins of the educated are sins at all. We are always talking about the sin of intemperate drinking, because it is quite obvious that the poor have it more than the rich. But we are always denying that there is any such thing as the sin of pride, because it would be quite obvious that the rich have it more than the poor. We are always ready to make a saint or prophet of the educated man who goes into cottages to give a little kindly advice to the uneducated. But the medieval idea of a saint or prophet was something quite different. The mediaeval saint or prophet was an uneducated man who walked into grand houses to give a little kindly advice to the educated.” ~GKC: ‘Heretics,’ XIX.

For the full copy of G.K. Chesterton’s works for free, go here. To purchase something you can hold and place in your shelves go here. For free audio (select), go here.

                 

Originally posted 2011-12-27 19:28:15. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

About Darius Styl

Lay Christian theologian and amateur philosopher.
This entry was posted in Ethics: Righteousness, G.K. Chesterton, Society and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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